Discussion:
Synchronisation programm
Waleri Enns
2003-04-14 16:06:43 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

im looking for a programm to synchronize my homes of my laptop and my
desktop machine.
I considered a solution with rsync, but it doesnt work for me, because:

- i want to see the differences and have the possibility to handle with
them interactively
- a gui would also be nice ;-)

can someone give me a hint where to look for?

tnx
wenns


--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Robert Spahr
2003-04-14 13:59:34 UTC
Permalink
Look at the program called "Unison"

That works great for me.

-- Rob


On 14 Apr 2003 18:06:43 +0200
Post by Waleri Enns
Hi,
im looking for a programm to synchronize my homes of my laptop and my
desktop machine.
- i want to see the differences and have the possibility to handle with
them interactively
- a gui would also be nice ;-)
can someone give me a hint where to look for?
tnx
wenns
--
--
Robert Spahr
http://www.brainwrench.com
PGP Public Key http://www.brainwrench.com/rob/public_key
stephen
2003-04-14 14:51:25 UTC
Permalink
There was an article on using CVS to sync the user's directory in a recent
issue of Linux Journal. Not the intended use of CVS, but it might work for you.

-- Stephen
Post by Robert Spahr
Look at the program called "Unison"
That works great for me.
-- Rob
On 14 Apr 2003 18:06:43 +0200
Post by Waleri Enns
Hi,
im looking for a programm to synchronize my homes of my laptop and my
desktop machine.
- i want to see the differences and have the possibility to handle with
them interactively
- a gui would also be nice ;-)
can someone give me a hint where to look for?
tnx
wenns
--
--
Robert Spahr
http://www.brainwrench.com
PGP Public Key http://www.brainwrench.com/rob/public_key
_________
Stephen

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Timothy Grant
2003-04-14 16:09:20 UTC
Permalink
I second the vote for Unison. It is quite the useful programme, even if it is
written in OCAML!
Post by Robert Spahr
Look at the program called "Unison"
That works great for me.
-- Rob
On 14 Apr 2003 18:06:43 +0200
Post by Waleri Enns
Hi,
im looking for a programm to synchronize my homes of my laptop and my
desktop machine.
- i want to see the differences and have the possibility to handle with
them interactively
- a gui would also be nice ;-)
can someone give me a hint where to look for?
tnx
wenns
--
--
Stand Fast,
tjg.

Timothy Grant
www.craigelachie.org


--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Fredrik Jagenheim
2003-04-14 20:23:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timothy Grant
I second the vote for Unison. It is quite the useful programme, even if it is
written in OCAML!
I know, I shouldn't feed the trolls, but... :)

Why does it matter in what language something is written? I know a
program is probably worthless if it lists one of its features as
'written in Java'. As if a program had reached a higher state of
usefulness if it was written in Java. I don't particually care if your
program is written in Java, Ruby, Perl, OCaml, or handoptimized
assembler, as long as it works and fulfill my purposes.

//H, who once tried to learn OCaml, but couldn't really break into
functional languages.
--
To segfault is human; to bluescreen moronic.

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Anders Johansson
2003-04-14 20:27:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fredrik Jagenheim
Post by Timothy Grant
I second the vote for Unison. It is quite the useful programme, even if it is
written in OCAML!
I know, I shouldn't feed the trolls, but... :)
Why does it matter in what language something is written? I know a
program is probably worthless if it lists one of its features as
'written in Java'. As if a program had reached a higher state of
usefulness if it was written in Java. I don't particually care if your
program is written in Java, Ruby, Perl, OCaml, or handoptimized
assembler, as long as it works and fulfill my purposes.
If it's written in java it means you can run it on just about any
platform. I think that's worth a mention.

If it's written in "handoptimized assembler" I would think twice, since
it's almost guaranteed to have subtle bugs that will hit you when you
least expect it.



--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Fredrik Jagenheim
2003-04-15 10:52:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anders Johansson
If it's written in java it means you can run it on just about any
platform. I think that's worth a mention.
That's theory. In practice, you're lucky if the program runs on the
same JVM on different architectures.

I've been working with a large company where they've had had some
large rollouts with java written tools. They had to supply a JVM with
every program, since the programs wouldn't work on each others JVM.

Anyway, most programs can run on about any platform. In some cases
they need a recompile though.

But, please, don't make this into a pro/con java flamewar. I'm glad
for you if you've had any positive experience from java, it's just
that I haven't. :)
Post by Anders Johansson
If it's written in "handoptimized assembler" I would think twice, since
it's almost guaranteed to have subtle bugs that will hit you when you
least expect it.
I took handoptimized assembler as an extreme just to make a point. :)

//H
--
To segfault is human; to bluescreen moronic.

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Timothy Grant
2003-04-14 20:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fredrik Jagenheim
Post by Timothy Grant
I second the vote for Unison. It is quite the useful programme, even if
it is written in OCAML!
I know, I shouldn't feed the trolls, but... :)
Not a troll. It's just that it is the only programme I have ever found that is
of any use outside of Academia that is written in OCAML. It also means that
fewer people have the expertise to change the code should they need to. I
only discovered it was written in OCAML when there *was* a change I wanted to
make (can't remember what now). And after getting the sources, I realized I'd
have to learn a new language if I wanted to change it.
--
Stand Fast,
tjg.

Timothy Grant
www.craigelachie.org


--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Fredrik Jagenheim
2003-04-15 11:05:20 UTC
Permalink
I only discovered it was written in OCAML when there *was* a change
I wanted to make (can't remember what now). And after getting the
sources, I realized I'd have to learn a new language if I wanted to
change it.
Yes, you make a very valid point. I'd counter it with "it's never
wrong to learn a new language, since learning a new language will give
you insight into your current language of choice and thus make you a
better programmer" if it wasn't for the fact that I myself have tried
to look over OCaml and failed utterly. :)

//H
--
To segfault is human; to bluescreen moronic.

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Timothy Grant
2003-04-15 17:12:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fredrik Jagenheim
I only discovered it was written in OCAML when there *was* a change
I wanted to make (can't remember what now). And after getting the
sources, I realized I'd have to learn a new language if I wanted to
change it.
Yes, you make a very valid point. I'd counter it with "it's never
wrong to learn a new language, since learning a new language will give
you insight into your current language of choice and thus make you a
better programmer" if it wasn't for the fact that I myself have tried
to look over OCaml and failed utterly. :)
Ahh, your experience, very much, mirrors mine. I took a look at it, said "I
can figure this out" and failed miserably to figure it out!

I'm not a Java programmer. The last time I played with Java was around
v1.1--or something like that. That didn't stop me from playing with some Java
code the other day (MegaMek) I wanted to change the way targeting works. I
was able to grep the code, then grok the code, and am confident I'll be able
to make the changes I want. No such luck with OCAML. Of course I have a
similar failure when it comes to Lisp.
--
Stand Fast,
tjg.

Timothy Grant
www.craigelachie.org


--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Sundance
2003-04-15 22:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fredrik Jagenheim
I'd counter it with "it's never
wrong to learn a new language, since learning a new language will
give you insight into your current language of choice and thus make
you a better programmer" if it wasn't for the fact that I myself have
tried to look over OCaml and failed utterly. :)
I don't think this applies to Objective Caml, because it is not just
another language, but another way entirely to think about programming.
OCaml purely functional, which you have little chance of 'just getting'
without some basic experience of functionnal programming. Trust me,
I've been there, and at first I hated it with a passion.

Only later did I realise how frighteningly powerful its approach is. At
first it is a total pain to get into -- to take one of the worst
examples, you can't add ints and floats, because '+' is an '(int, int)
-> int' kind of function, and there's a dedicated operator (+.) to add
floats together... And if you're gonna add ints and floats then you're
on your own. The counterpart is that your code basically validates
itself as you type it. If that tells you anything, the OCaml compiler
itself is written in OCaml, it produces code that compares (and often
beats) with C++ in terms of speed. It even beats C, sometimes, or so I
hear.

In short, OCaml is really great, but it's just not for us mere mortals.
:)

-- S.

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list

Waleri Enns
2003-04-15 11:16:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timothy Grant
I second the vote for Unison. It is quite the useful programme, even if it is
written in OCAML!
I have tried it yesterday. it has a lot of functionality and it is of
use for me. But the user interface is a little bit... skew. For example,
it is pretty annoying to say "[forever] ignore this diff" for every file
in a directory, if you have a lot of diffs. I would prefere that the
conflicts are displayed hierarchically with the possibility for the user
to say "[forever] ignore all conficts underneath this dir".

Furthermore it think it would be nice to swith to gtk2 (if there are
bindings for OCAML ;-) ) and perhaps to integrate the thing into gnome
environment (for example, to use gnome-help-system to show all the dox)

cheers
wenns



--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Condon Thomas A KPWA
2003-04-14 21:00:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timothy Grant
Not a troll. It's just that it is the only programme I have ever
found that is of any use outside of Academia that is written in
OCAML. It also means that fewer people have the expertise to change
the code should they need to. I only discovered it was written in
OCAML when there *was* a change I wanted to make (can't remember what
now). And after getting the sources, I realized I'd have to learn a
new language if I wanted to change it.
And all this time I thought O'Camel was the Irish-Arab fellow down the
block! ;-}>


In Harmony's Way, and In A Chord,

Tom :-})

Thomas A. Condon
Barbershop Bass Singer
Registered Linux User #154358
A Jester Unemployed

--
gentoo-***@gentoo.org mailing list
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...