Discussion:
Graphical usenet client - alternative to Knode
(too old to reply)
Stroller
2010-02-23 05:42:25 UTC
Permalink
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised
"don't try using just Kmail under a different window manager - use the
whole KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something else instead
of Kmail".

I kept my gob somewhat shut at that time, because I've been using
Knode for a long time on my headless server. I ssh in from my Mac and
open Knode in X11.

I guess Usenet isn't so popular these days, and I have never been able
to find a Mac native client that I'm happy with.

I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually with
the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies thing.

It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an alternative
that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part of the whole
KDE4 environment.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance,

Stroller.
Peter Ruskin
2010-02-23 09:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stroller
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised
"don't try using just Kmail under a different window manager -
use the whole KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something
else instead of Kmail".
I kept my gob somewhat shut at that time, because I've been using
Knode for a long time on my headless server. I ssh in from my Mac
and open Knode in X11.
I guess Usenet isn't so popular these days, and I have never been
able to find a Mac native client that I'm happy with.
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually
with the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies
thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an
alternative that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part
of the whole KDE4 environment.
Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance,
Stroller.
I've always used pan in preference to knode.
--
Peter
========================================================================
Gentoo Linux: Portage 2.2_rc63 kernel-2.6.32-gentoo-r5
AMD Phenom(tm) 9950 Quad-Core Processor gcc(Gentoo: 4.4.3)
KDE: 3.5.10 Qt: 3.3.8b
========================================================================
ubiquitous1980
2010-02-23 09:16:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ruskin
Post by Stroller
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised
"don't try using just Kmail under a different window manager -
use the whole KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something
else instead of Kmail".
I kept my gob somewhat shut at that time, because I've been using
Knode for a long time on my headless server. I ssh in from my Mac
and open Knode in X11.
I guess Usenet isn't so popular these days, and I have never been
able to find a Mac native client that I'm happy with.
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually
with the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies
thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an
alternative that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part
of the whole KDE4 environment.
Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance,
Stroller.
I've always used pan in preference to knode.
I don't use knode or usenet, but am I missing something? Can't kde4
applications be used on Mac these days?
Stroller
2010-02-23 22:57:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by ubiquitous1980
...
I don't use knode or usenet, but am I missing something? Can't kde4
applications be used on Mac these days?
Perhaps.

The Mac Unix experience is that grep and sed and shellscripts and
stuff like that are useful. If you just want something small like
exiftool then it's easy to make && install it.

Larger packages with lots of dependencies, though, it's just less
hassle to let a native package manager install them under Linux.

Stroller.
Stroller
2010-02-23 22:51:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ruskin
...
I've always used pan in preference to knode.
Thanks. From the screenshots at <http://pan.rebelbase.com/screenshots/
Post by Peter Ruskin
it looks perfect.
Stroller.
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 09:09:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stroller
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised
"don't try using just Kmail under a different window manager - use the
whole KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something else instead
of Kmail".
I took it more as "KDE programs are intended to be run on KDE, so don't
complain if they don't work as you want elsewhere". So if it works and
you are happy with it, why change?
Post by Stroller
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually with
the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an alternative
that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part of the whole
KDE4 environment.
I haven't done usenet in a while, but when I did I preferred Pan to
Knode. While I am a KDE fan, I do find myself using quite a few GTK apps
on my KDE desktop.
--
Neil Bothwick

The considered application of terror is also a form of communication.
Stroller
2010-02-23 22:58:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Stroller
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised
"don't try using just Kmail under a different window manager - use the
whole KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something else instead
of Kmail".
I took it more as "KDE programs are intended to be run on KDE, so don't
complain if they don't work as you want elsewhere". So if it works and
you are happy with it, why change?
Well, duh! I'm not really happy with it. Not with all the
dependencies. And whilst I see why they're necessary regarding KDE's
future direction, I'd prefer to be without them.

Stroller.
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 10:11:40 UTC
Permalink
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised "don't
try using just Kmail under a different window manager - use the whole
KDE environment, but not single apps. Use something else instead of Kmail".
I kept my gob somewhat shut at that time, because I've been using Knode
for a long time on my headless server. I ssh in from my Mac and open
Knode in X11.
I guess Usenet isn't so popular these days, and I have never been able
to find a Mac native client that I'm happy with.
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually with
the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an alternative
that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part of the whole KDE4
environment.
Any suggestions?
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 10:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read it
in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
--
Neil Bothwick

SITCOM: Single Income, Two Children, Oppressive Mortgage
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 11:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read it
in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be the
one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.

I am currently "subscribed" to 31 mailing lists on GMane. I don't even
want to imagine what would happen if I would receive email from all of
them (and 90% of the posts would not interest me anyway, so why recieve
them in the first place?) It's just not practical. A Usenet-like
front-end is the perfect solution here; a mailing list is very similar
to a Usenet newsgroup and that's why this approach is the most practical
one. And even if I were subscribed to only one list, it would still be
the best way to access it; even though the traffic is much lower when
compared to 31 lists, but it's still high enough to get annoying with
something landing on your inbox every 10 minutes or so, even stuff you
don't intend to read. With Usenet, you only get what you're interested
in, and you get it in a way that is very easy to access and browse though.
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 11:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read it
in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be the
one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.
Just to make my point more clear:

Loading Image...

All of these under the "GMane" groups are mailing lists, but they appear
just like Usenet newsgroups. I can't imagine any easier way to easily
deal with 30+ mailing list subscriptions.
Mick
2010-02-23 12:18:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read it
in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be the
one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.
 http://i50.tinypic.com/15ow2g8.png
All of these under the "GMane" groups are mailing lists, but they appear
just like Usenet newsgroups.  I can't imagine any easier way to easily deal
with 30+ mailing list subscriptions.
Also, unlike when using a mail client, with usenet you don't have to
download the message/thread if you're not interested in reading it.

Back to the OP's topic, I am also using Knode (but not for this M/L).
If you set your USE flags right you should be able to continue using
Kmail/Knode without some of the dependencies that the full KDE4
desktop requires. However, I don't know if from KDE4.4 changes on
dependencies (as per recent thread on semantic-desktop) mean that more
of these will be pulled in.
--
Regards,
Mick
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 13:09:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
http://i50.tinypic.com/15ow2g8.png
All of these under the "GMane" groups are mailing lists, but they
appear just like Usenet newsgroups. I can't imagine any easier way to
easily deal with 30+ mailing list subscriptions.
That looks just like my mailboxes do :)
--
Neil Bothwick

Anything is possible if you don't know what
you are talking about.
Grant Edwards
2010-02-23 15:45:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only
to read it in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be
even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I
would be the one responsible for filtering it; a total waste
on bandwidth and my time. GMane does that for me instead.
http://i50.tinypic.com/15ow2g8.png
All of these under the "GMane" groups are mailing lists, but they appear
just like Usenet newsgroups. I can't imagine any easier way to easily
deal with 30+ mailing list subscriptions.
I too use Gmane to read all mailing lists, but I use a
dedicated news client (slrn) instead of a combined e-mail/news
client. I definitely don't want all those e-mailes coming
through my in-box where _I've_ got to filter, sort, and archive
them. I'd much rather let gmane handle that.
--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! BARBARA STANWYCK makes
at me nervous!!
visi.com
Frank Steinmetzger
2010-02-25 21:45:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read
it in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be the
one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.
http://i50.tinypic.com/15ow2g8.png
OT: It occured to me that many, including you, have this awfully fuzzy font
rendering. Aren’t you bothered by that? (Assuming you’re on a TFT). When I
look at your image, my view starts floating on a plane in front of the screen.

See Loading Image...

As you can see, I’m also using a mail client for those lists. At the
beginning, I used my Uni’s news server, but at some point, I couldn’t post to
this list anymore through NNTP. So I had to switch to mail interface.

But even though local archiving works better with mails (articles are gone
from the news server after a short while), I’d prefer the NNTP way though,
it’s easier to view the list filtered (e.g. no ignored threads).
--
Gruß | Greetings | Qapla' - http://www.stud.tu-ilmenau.de/~frst-ii/ - EDOB
Nicht von Staat und Konzernen ausschnÃŒffeln lassen, E-Mails verschlÃŒsseln!
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Privacy_Guard http://hp.kairaven.de/pgp/

Die USA haben den Weg von der Barbarei zur Dekadenz
ohne den Umweg Ìber die Kultur gewÀhlt.
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-25 22:33:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Steinmetzger
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I'm on KDE4 but I use Thunderbird for both Usenet (including this
mailing list through GMane's "mailing-list-to-Usenet" interface) and
email. I like the simplicity and using only one app for both.
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to read
it in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be the
one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.
http://i50.tinypic.com/15ow2g8.png
OT: It occured to me that many, including you, have this awfully fuzzy font
rendering. Aren’t you bothered by that? (Assuming you’re on a TFT). When I
look at your image, my view starts floating on a plane in front of the screen.
See http://i47.tinypic.com/1zxsbok.png
No, actually I find it much better then the one in your screenshot.
Much easier to read for me. I guess this is due to differences in our
monitor's DPI. I can image that lower DPI monitors must show it pretty
"zoomed-in" and therefore blurry. The fonts in your screenshot actually
look like small, thin lines instead of proper fonts here.
Post by Frank Steinmetzger
As you can see, I’m also using a mail client for those lists. At the
beginning, I used my Uni’s news server, but at some point, I couldn’t post to
this list anymore through NNTP. So I had to switch to mail interface.
But even though local archiving works better with mails (articles are gone
from the news server after a short while), I’d prefer the NNTP way though,
it’s easier to view the list filtered (e.g. no ignored threads).
For what it's worth, GMane's NNTP server never deletes messages. In the
case of gentoo-user, everything's still there; the oldest posts date
back to 2002.

Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 13:08:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Why are you passing the mail through a conversion gateway only to
read it in a mail client? Wouldn't subscribing directly be even more
simple?
No, because then I would get all the mail in my inbox and I would be
the one responsible for filtering it; a total waste on bandwidth and my
time. GMane does that for me instead.
Well, setting up filters is hardly taxing or time consuming, but I see
your point.
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I am currently "subscribed" to 31 mailing lists on GMane. I don't even
want to imagine what would happen if I would receive email from all of
them (and 90% of the posts would not interest me anyway, so why recieve
them in the first place?) It's just not practical. A Usenet-like
front-end is the perfect solution here; a mailing list is very similar
to a Usenet newsgroup and that's why this approach is the most
practical one. And even if I were subscribed to only one list, it
would still be the best way to access it; even though the traffic is
much lower when compared to 31 lists, but it's still high enough to get
annoying with something landing on your inbox every 10 minutes or so,
even stuff you don't intend to read. With Usenet, you only get what
you're interested in, and you get it in a way that is very easy to
access and browse though.
With the downside being that the process is slower, as you have to
download each message or thread as you want to read it. Contrast this
with having email delivered whether you are reading it or not and being
filtered at the moment of arrival so it is instantly available, sorted
into folders, when you start up your client. However, this convenience
uses more bandwidth, so if that is worth more to you than your time, using
Usenet for selective reading does make sense.
--
Neil Bothwick

furbling, v.:
Having to wander through a maze of ropes at an airport or bank
even when you are the only person in line.
-- Rich Hall, "Sniglets"
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 14:59:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
I am currently "subscribed" to 31 mailing lists on GMane. I don't even
want to imagine what would happen if I would receive email from all of
them (and 90% of the posts would not interest me anyway, so why recieve
them in the first place?) It's just not practical. A Usenet-like
front-end is the perfect solution here; a mailing list is very similar
to a Usenet newsgroup and that's why this approach is the most
practical one. And even if I were subscribed to only one list, it
would still be the best way to access it; even though the traffic is
much lower when compared to 31 lists, but it's still high enough to get
annoying with something landing on your inbox every 10 minutes or so,
even stuff you don't intend to read. With Usenet, you only get what
you're interested in, and you get it in a way that is very easy to
access and browse though.
With the downside being that the process is slower, as you have to
download each message or thread as you want to read it. Contrast this
with having email delivered whether you are reading it or not and being
filtered at the moment of arrival so it is instantly available, sorted
into folders, when you start up your client. However, this convenience
uses more bandwidth, so if that is worth more to you than your time, using
Usenet for selective reading does make sense.
No, each message gets downloaded in under 1 second; it immediately
appears when you click on it. It's blindingly fast. No surprise
though, since it's just text. However, downloading thousands of
messages per day that I don't intent to read is a waste of bandwidth.
It's not so much about time, it's about volume.

You and I do the same thing in the end. The difference is that you
waste bandwidth, need to set up filters every time you subscribe to a
new list, need to unsubscribe when you don't want to receive email
anymore, need hard disk space to store all the downloaded messages,
don't have access to messages from the time you weren't subscribed yet,
and probably more I can't think of right now.

So in the end, we end up doing the same thing, by I do it in a saner way
that was designed to do exactly that. :) It appears it only has pros
and no cons, so I don't see a reason to use email instead.
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 15:15:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
You and I do the same thing in the end. The difference is that you
waste bandwidth, need to set up filters every time you subscribe to a
new list
Which takes about ten seconds usually.
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
, need to unsubscribe when you don't want to receive email
anymore,
Which takes about half that time, and both of these are infrequent
occurrences. For lists that I had only a transient interest in, I would
look at usenet versions.
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
need hard disk space to store all the downloaded messages,
don't have access to messages from the time you weren't subscribed yet,
No, but I do have access to Google :)
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
So in the end, we end up doing the same thing, by I do it in a saner
way that was designed to do exactly that. :)
No, you do it in a different way that suits your needs. That doesn't make
you right and people with other needs wrong. It just illustrates the
benefits of choice. I did not insult your choice, why assume that you
know better than me what I need?
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
It appears it only has
pros and no cons, so I don't see a reason to use email instead.
How do you read messages without an Internet connection?

Everything has pros and cons.
--
Neil Bothwick

Walk softly and carry a fully charged phazer.
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 16:25:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
You and I do the same thing in the end. The difference is that you
waste bandwidth, need to set up filters every time you subscribe to a
new list
Which takes about ten seconds usually.
10 is more than 0 :D
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
, need to unsubscribe when you don't want to receive email
anymore,
Which takes about half that time, and both of these are infrequent
occurrences. For lists that I had only a transient interest in, I would
look at usenet versions.
And when later you want to subscribe again...
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
need hard disk space to store all the downloaded messages,
don't have access to messages from the time you weren't subscribed yet,
No, but I do have access to Google :)
Yes, but this requires to go to Google. I have the messages right there
in front of me.
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
So in the end, we end up doing the same thing, by I do it in a saner
way that was designed to do exactly that. :)
No, you do it in a different way that suits your needs. That doesn't make
you right and people with other needs wrong. It just illustrates the
benefits of choice. I did not insult your choice, why assume that you
know better than me what I need?
No, that wasn't my intention. All I'm saying in the end is that people
stick to the ways they are used to do their tasks. There might be
better options out there, but it requires getting used to those new
options so they usually don't bother. I just though I'd mention the
stuff here so people actually know the option exists and has saved me
from quite some annoyances I had to deal with in the past.
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
It appears it only has
pros and no cons, so I don't see a reason to use email instead.
How do you read messages without an Internet connection?
Everything has pros and cons.
You got me with that one :) Just because I don't have this problem
doesn't mean no else does either.
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 17:42:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Which takes about ten seconds usually.
10 is more than 0 :D
Not for large values of 0 :)
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
, need to unsubscribe when you don't want to receive email
anymore,
Which takes about half that time, and both of these are infrequent
occurrences. For lists that I had only a transient interest in, I
would look at usenet versions.
And when later you want to subscribe again...
I'm not that indecisive... at least, I don't think I am ;-)
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
need hard disk space to store all the downloaded messages,
don't have access to messages from the time you weren't subscribed yet,
No, but I do have access to Google :)
Yes, but this requires to go to Google. I have the messages right
there in front of me.
What, all of them? You still need to search for old messages and if they
predate your subscribing you are only searching for specific information,
not particular threads. Or are you referring to backtracking a thread you
joined midway through? For that, online archives are useful.
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
No, that wasn't my intention. All I'm saying in the end is that people
stick to the ways they are used to do their tasks. There might be
better options out there, but it requires getting used to those new
options so they usually don't bother. I just though I'd mention the
stuff here so people actually know the option exists and has saved me
from quite some annoyances I had to deal with in the past.
Fair enough.
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
How do you read messages without an Internet connection?
Everything has pros and cons.
You got me with that one :) Just because I don't have this problem
doesn't mean no else does either.
You are permanently wired to the Internet? Don't you ever go out? :P
--
Neil Bothwick

Windows to CPU: Don't rush me, don't rush me...
Nikos Chantziaras
2010-02-23 19:22:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
[...]
You got me with that one :) Just because I don't have this problem
doesn't mean no else does either.
You are permanently wired to the Internet? Don't you ever go out? :P
I'm referring to the machine. It's always connected. Broadband
flatrate ftw :P There's no point in ever disconnecting it.
Zeerak Mustafa Waseem
2010-02-23 20:06:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
[...]
You got me with that one :) Just because I don't have this problem
doesn't mean no else does either.
You are permanently wired to the Internet? Don't you ever go out? :P
I'm referring to the machine. It's always connected. Broadband
flatrate ftw :P There's no point in ever disconnecting it.
Someone obviously isn't a student with ridiculously expensive electricity. ;-)
--
Zeerak Waseem
Alan McKinnon
2010-02-23 22:29:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeerak Mustafa Waseem
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Nikos Chantziaras
[...]
You got me with that one :) Just because I don't have this problem
doesn't mean no else does either.
You are permanently wired to the Internet? Don't you ever go out? :P
I'm referring to the machine. It's always connected. Broadband
flatrate ftw :P There's no point in ever disconnecting it.
Someone obviously isn't a student with ridiculously expensive electricity. ;-)
Or an admin at a major ISP and *very* good friends with those who dish out the
bandwidth ....

A man must look after his friends in this world, and they will look after you

:-)
--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
Peter Humphrey
2010-02-24 00:55:27 UTC
Permalink
There might be better options out there, but it requires getting used
to those new options so they usually don't bother.
That's me with cfg-update, conf-update etc. I got used to etc-update and
I still use it because I know how to.
--
Rgds
Peter.
Grant Edwards
2010-02-23 15:48:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
With the downside being that the process is slower, as you
have to download each message or thread as you want to read
it. Contrast this with having email delivered whether you are
reading it or not and being filtered at the moment of arrival
so it is instantly available, sorted into folders, when you
start up your client.
I get the impression you always read the mailing lists on a
single machine? I read Gmane's "lists" from 4-5 different
machines and locations. Duplicating all that mail locally on
all those machines would be a pain.
Post by Neil Bothwick
However, this convenience uses more bandwidth, so if that is
worth more to you than your time, using Usenet for selective
reading does make sense.
--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Hello... IRON
at CURTAIN? Send over a
visi.com SAUSAGE PIZZA! World War
III? No thanks!
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 16:52:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Edwards
I get the impression you always read the mailing lists on a
single machine? I read Gmane's "lists" from 4-5 different
machines and locations. Duplicating all that mail locally on
all those machines would be a pain.
No, I read them from a number of machines but using a single server that
handles all the filtering too.
--
Neil Bothwick

Theory is when you know everything, but nothing works.
Reality is when everything works, but you don't know why.
However, usually theory and reality are mixed together :
Nothing works, and nobody knows why not.
Grant Edwards
2010-02-23 18:33:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Grant Edwards
I get the impression you always read the mailing lists on a
single machine? I read Gmane's "lists" from 4-5 different
machines and locations. Duplicating all that mail locally on
all those machines would be a pain.
No, I read them from a number of machines but using a single
server that handles all the filtering too.
Same here -- the only difference between the two approaches is
who's administering the server. You handle it yourself, I let
gmane do it. :)
--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Of course, you
at UNDERSTAND about the PLAIDS
visi.com in the SPIN CYCLE --
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 19:36:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Edwards
Post by Neil Bothwick
No, I read them from a number of machines but using a single
server that handles all the filtering too.
Same here -- the only difference between the two approaches is
who's administering the server. You handle it yourself, I let
gmane do it. :)
The main difference is that mine still works when my Internet connection
is not available. And that all my mail is accessible from the same place,
including mails I'd never put on a server owned by someone else.
--
Neil Bothwick

The law of Probability Dispersal decrees that whatever it is that hits
the fan will not be evenly distributed.
Grant Edwards
2010-02-23 22:32:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Bothwick
Post by Grant Edwards
Post by Neil Bothwick
No, I read them from a number of machines but using a single
server that handles all the filtering too.
Same here -- the only difference between the two approaches is
who's administering the server. You handle it yourself, I let
gmane do it. :)
The main difference is that mine still works when my Internet
connection is not available.
I read the mailing lists from many different locations. I don't
keep complete Usenet and mailing-list archives at all machines
and locations. It doesn't really matter to me where the server
is -- if I've no network access, I can't read Usenet or mailing
lists. But, it's just not an issue.
Post by Neil Bothwick
And that all my mail is accessible from the same place,
including mails I'd never put on a server owned by someone
else.
I guess I just have no interest in keeping archives of 50
newsgroups/mailing-lists on a handful of different machines.
Any "servers" I set up would be a lot less reliable and
accessible than those at either Gmane or my Usenet provider.
--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! So this is what it
at feels like to be potato
visi.com salad
Neil Bothwick
2010-02-23 23:02:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Edwards
Post by Neil Bothwick
And that all my mail is accessible from the same place,
including mails I'd never put on a server owned by someone
else.
I guess I just have no interest in keeping archives of 50
newsgroups/mailing-lists on a handful of different machines.
Nor me, that's why it's all on one server.
Post by Grant Edwards
Any "servers" I set up would be a lot less reliable and
accessible than those at either Gmane or my Usenet provider.
Possible, but the connection between them and you may not. I need to keep
some of my mails locally, not stored at an online service - as the server
is already there and set up, it makes sense to use it for everything. For
me, using an email-to-usenet gateway would actually mean more work.
--
Neil Bothwick

Two rights don't make a wrong, they make an airplane.
Paul Hartman
2010-02-23 16:15:18 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, Feb 22, 2010 at 11:42 PM, Stroller
Some comments were made recently about KDE4, where it was advised "don't try
using just Kmail under a different window manager - use the whole KDE
environment, but not single apps. Use something else instead of Kmail".
I kept my gob somewhat shut at that time, because I've been using Knode for
a long time on my headless server. I ssh in from my Mac and open Knode in
X11.
I guess Usenet isn't so popular these days, and I have never been able to
find a Mac native client that I'm happy with.
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually with the
KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an alternative that
looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part of the whole KDE4
environment.
Any suggestions?
For textual usenet i use mail-client/mozilla-thunderbird. For binary
usenet I use net-nntp/bnr2.
»Q«
2010-02-25 04:32:31 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 05:42:25 +0000
Post by Stroller
I like Knode's simple 3-pane layout. Knode has improved visually
with the KDE4 release, but the much debated KDE4 dependencies thing.
It has only just occurred to me today to ask if there's an
alternative that looks & acts just the same, but which isn't part of
the whole KDE4 environment.
Any suggestions?
I'll add Claws Mail (mail-client/claws-mail) to the list of
suggestions. It does three panes by default and has a gtk interface.
As you can probably guess from the name, it does e-mail also.
--
»Q«
Kleeneness is next to Gödelness.
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